Election Violence and Intimidation

Our team has collected research on policies and practices that exist in the event of violence or intimidation toward voters. We've collected them here for reference.

“Election observers,” sometimes called “poll watchers,” are  a cohort of people who watch over the voting process and report on inconsistencies and election violations, and challenge the authenticity of voters. This memorandum details the requirements for election observation in battleground states, analyzes national patterns, examines the types of oversight election observers conduct, and surveys the type of processes states have created for electoral oversight.

Memo / October 09, 2020
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The threat of election-related violence is not new to the United States, but the 2020 election has provoked greater concern and attention to the problem than any election in recent memory. This memo surveys state-level policies for addressing Election Day violence in eleven swing states.

Memo / October 08, 2020
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Given the renewed attention and the greater likelihood that voter intimidation may be a bigger problem in 2020 than in recent elections, clarifying the concept of voter intimidation has become more important than in past elections. This memo sheds light on the rules and guidance aimed at preventing voter intimidation in six battleground states: Arizona, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

Memo / October 08, 2020
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Latest Updates

10/23/20 - In Florida, the Pinellas County Sheriff’s Office is placing uniformed officers at early voting locations after two armed security guards were seen standing close to people campaigning for candidates, an incident that was reported for potential voter intimidation.

10/23/20 - Secretary of State Michael Adams issued guidelines on voter intimidation and how voters and poll workers should handle cases of voter intimidation. The report contains what is and is not allowed at the polling place, and how rules should be enforced at the polls.